LALM fall cover.bmpThe Autumn Edition of Law à la Mode is now available online: click here to view the e-magazine.

With a Belgian editorial team for this edition, we wanted to give a flavour of an up and coming fashion capital in the heart of Europe. With a mix of cultures from Europe and beyond, Belgium is fast becoming a key location for new design and innovation in fashion. More than just moules, frites and beer, we are fortunate enough to have some of the most renowned fashion academies in Antwerp and Brussels generating internationally known designers such as Dries Van Noten, Ann Demeulemeester, Martin Margiela and Olivier Theyskens. 
As Belgium is also the hub of EU policy development and creation, we share with you our thoughts on the trends around policy making – steering you through the agenda and potential activity (page 4).
Sustainability being the buzz word of the moment in relation to product development, we have an insight from our UK team on the interplay between the sustainability debate and the fashion industry (page 5).
In the wake of the global financial crisis, this season our US team evaluates what a shift in the wider economic market has meant for franchising activities in the US (pages 6-7), and we discuss the impact of the climate on the UK retail market (pages 12-13).
With more of a focus than ever on the ability to effectively market products to consumers, our experts analyse the finer details of production techniques for cosmetic advertising (page 8) and present our new 10 commandments for online retailers originating from the EU (pages 10-11). We also look into the new EU Regulation on textile labelling, which will impact on all designers (page 9), and a recent CJEU judgement focussed on the liability of online market places where users offer infringing goods (page 14). 
In our regular “A word from the Industry’s Mouth” we share an in-depth insight from a leading Chinese brand hoping to broaden its global fashion image (pages 15-16). And last, but not least, our series devoted to fashion and social media in which our US team evaluates the developing role of social media in the fashion retail space (pages 17-18).
If you have any comments please get in touch with the FRD Group via our email: fashion@dlapiper.com
We hope that you enjoy browsing through this season’s collection of articles.

With a Belgian editorial team for this edition, we wanted to give a flavour of an up and coming fashion capital in the heart of Europe. With a mix of cultures from Europe and beyond, Belgium is fast becoming a key location for new design and innovation in fashion. More than just moules, frites and beer, we are fortunate enough to have some of the most renowned fashion academies in Antwerp and Brussels generating internationally known designers such as Dries Van Noten, Ann Demeulemeester, Martin Margiela and Olivier Theyskens. 

As Belgium is also the hub of EU policy development and creation, we share with you our thoughts on the trends around policy making – steering you through the agenda and potential activity (page 4).

Sustainability being the buzz word of the moment in relation to product development, we have an insight from our UK team on the interplay between the sustainability debate and the fashion industry (page 5).


Continue Reading

Reposted from Intellectual Property and Technology News, Issue 11, Q3 2011

ARTICLE
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNOLOGY NEWS
Darius C. Gambino 
Tiffany Nichols 

By Darius C. Gambino and Tiffany Nichols

When companies form legal strategies to protect their IP assets and trade secrets, employment agreements are an essential part of the overall structure. Today’s work force is increasingly specialized, and companies extend across jurisdictions with different laws. In this competitive, potentially litigious environment, companies should consider customizing employment agreements for each position, and in some cases, for each individual employee, especially those in executive and leadership roles.


Continue Reading

NEWS

Costa Rica: Ratification of Hague Apostille Convention

Greece: New Draft Trademark Law to Be Submitted to Parliament

New Zealand: Changes to New Zealand Designs Practice

Portugal: Creation of a Specialized Court of Intellectual Property, The IP Court

CASE LAW

CA Paris, Pôle 5 ch. 2, April 1st, 2011, Sté Elytel v/ Sté Univers Poche

CheapFlights International Ltd v OHIM, Cases T-460/09 and T-461/09, 5 May 2011.

DHL Express France v Chronopost SA, Case C-235/09, 12 April 2011.


Continue Reading

Reposted from the latest version of our Intellectual Property and Technology newsletter (Q1, 2011) (PDF here).  Also available at DLA Piper’s website.

The legal profession has long revered individuals who demonstrate high intelligence and strong technical competence. In recent years, however, there has been growing recognition that another critical part of professional success is emotional intelligence, or EQ. While being technically proficient at one’s craft is essential, for both professionals and organizations it is no longer enough. As the legal profession increasingly aligns with clients’ business needs and methodologies, the soft skills embodied in EQ will often make the meaningful difference in determining the trajectory of one’s career and a company’s success.
While the concept of emotional intelligence has been around for many years, it became mainstream in the mid-1990s with Daniel Goleman’s groundbreaking book, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Goleman focuses on a skill set that drives leadership, performance and success:
Self-awareness – understanding yourself and your emotions
Self-management – managing oneself in response to people and situations
Social awareness – sensing and responding to others’ emotions and comprehending social networks
Relationship management – inspiring and developing others while managing conflict
While some people may possess these skills innately, it is possible to acquire them through training and practice. Along with one’s technical abilities, these skills contribute to personal and professional success and drive the ability to be effective.
Research in the fields of neuroscience and psychology strongly supports the importance of emotional intelligence in driving professional success. Indeed, EQ has been determined to be just as important, if not more, than one’s IQ. In fact, some researchers have concluded that, across many professions, EQ accounts for 58 percent of one’s performance.1 Moreover, 90 percent of high performers have been found to have a high EQ, whereas only 20 percent of low performers do.2 Notably, the legal profession is continually evolving its efforts to develop and reward EQ-based skills. In such areas as business development, talent recruitment, mentoring, client service, diversity and inclusion, project management, and professional and community leadership, EQ-based skills provide common threads. They enable effective development of relationships, collegiality, team building, strategic partnering, intuition, empathy, humility, compassion, understanding and the ability to influence others. The common denominators among these traits are self-awareness and effectively developing a meaningful connection with others. By practicing these skills on a regular basis, lawyers can become more effective, both personally and professionally. This ultimately accrues to the benefit of individual practitioners, their organizations, their clients and their communities.
In practice, lawyers with high EQs also differentiate themselves from their peers by demonstrating an array of talents and a propensity for flexibility and leadership. This is particularly important during challenging economic times, when law firms and corporations alike are continually looking for ways to streamline their workforce. Those with high EQs are often powerful managers and leaders, resilient, optimistic, confident and creative communicators with sound decision-making abilities. These skills will make them not only successful professionals, but also effective agents for EQ-based qualities.
In future editions of the IPT News, this column will examine emotional intelligence as related to aspects of the legal profession, including client service, case management, talent management and mentoring, diversity and inclusion, leadership and business development. In the context of EQ skills and competencies, we will look at ourselves and the organizations where we work, providing a new window on our personal and professional relationships and ways we can be effective agents for change and success.
 
1 Travis Bradberry & Jean Greaves, Emotional Intelligence 2.0 20-21 (TalentSmart 2009).
2 Id. at 21.

The legal profession has long revered individuals who demonstrate high intelligence and strong technical competence. In recent years, however, there has been growing recognition that another critical part of professional success is emotional intelligence, or EQ. While being technically proficient at one’s craft is essential, for both professionals and organizations it is no longer enough. As the legal profession increasingly aligns with clients’ business needs and methodologies, the soft skills embodied in EQ will often make the meaningful difference in determining the trajectory of one’s career and a company’s success.

While the concept of emotional intelligence has been around for many years, it became mainstream in the mid-1990s with Daniel Goleman’s groundbreaking book, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Goleman focuses on a skill set that drives leadership, performance and success:

  1. Self-awareness – understanding yourself and your emotions
  2. Self-management – managing oneself in response to people and situations
  3. Social awareness – sensing and responding to others’ emotions and comprehending social networks
  4. Relationship management – inspiring and developing others while managing conflict

While some people may possess these skills innately, it is possible to acquire them through training and practice. Along with one’s technical abilities, these skills contribute to personal and professional success and drive the ability to be effective.


Continue Reading