The Asian Pacific American Bar Association of the Greater Washington, D.C. Area, Inc. (“APABA-DC”) held its 2013 Awards and Installation Dinner on September 12, 2013 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.  As “the oldest and largest association of Asian Pacific American attorneys in the Washington, D.C. area,” APABA-DC has been the forefront of the professional growth and advancement of Asian American legal community, and the cultivation of the Asian Pacific American (“APA”) community.


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Reposted from DLA Piper’s Sports, Media and Entertainment Blog

By Frank Ryan, Richard Flaggert, Matthew Ganas and Rebecca Smock

On May 21, 2013, the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit held that the First Amendment does not shield Electronic Arts, Inc. (EA) from right of publicity violations alleged in connection with its depiction of college-athlete “avatars” in its series of NCAA Football videogames. Ryan Hart v. Electronic Arts, Inc., No. 11-3750, 2013 U.S. App. LEXIS 10171 (3d Cir. 2013).

As a matter of first impression for the Third Circuit, the Hart case involves the complex intersection of First Amendment protections and the publicity rights of individuals. By determining that plaintiff Ryan Hart’s publicity rights trump First Amendment considerations in this instance, a Third Circuit majority panel reversed the US District Court of New Jersey’s prior grant of summary judgment in EA’s favor and remanded the case to the district court for further proceedings.


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By Radiance W. Harris

On April 10, 2013, Florida revised several provisions of its game promotion statute, which will likely change how for-profit brands and non-profit entities offer contests and sweepstakes within the State and to its residents. In particular, these revisions include:

• A game promotion can only be operated by a for-profit organization on a limited and occasional basis as an advertising or marketing tool in connection with and incidental to bona fide sales of consumer products or services, if no purchase is necessary to play; and

• Non-profit entities and charitable organizations cannot operate a game promotion.


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