By Rohan Singh (Special Counsel) & Jessica Noakesmith (Graduate)

A recent report based on customs’ seizures by The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) found that fake information and communications technology (ICT) goods accounted for 6.5% of the overall ICT trade, well up on the 2.5% of overall traded goods found to be fake in a 2016 report. The report included both final products and intermediary parts such as network components and communications hardware, and concluded that nearly one in five mobile phones and one in four video game consoles shipped internationally is fake. This is not a shock as the steady demand for products in the ICT sector is a lucrative target.

Counterfeits are products that infringe trade mark with the intent of passing them off as authentic. As ICT goods are more complex than say fake handbags, the average consumer cannot tell the difference between a branded smart phone and a counterfeit phone or component. The effect of counterfeiting is widely felt by businesses across in the ICT sector in many regions.


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By James Clark (Leeds)

Most of us are familiar with the many ways in which customer activity can be tracked in the online space. Customer accounts, cookies, web beacons and tracking pixels are familiar tools in the e-commerce arsenal, and all come with familiar challenges from a privacy and data protection perspective. Increasingly, retailers are expanding tracking technologies into the physical space through the use of Wi-Fi location analytics. As the benefits of tracking translate into the real world, so too do the compliance obligations.
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By Michael Senkowski, Nancy Victory, and Michael Lewis

The pace of innovation for wireless products and services over the past decade or so has been breathtaking. Since the introduction of the iPhone – less than 10 years ago – near-ubiquitous mobile networks have developed to provide instant broadband access to the Internet for streaming news, sports, and entertainment. But the ability to stay in constant contact with friends or check the latest sports scores from just about anywhere is only one part of the wireless revolution. A vast number of applications and services have developed that use wireless technologies to make us smarter, more efficient, safer and healthier. Medical implant devices now monitor and regulate internal organ activity; some, using wireless technology, immediately notify doctors of critical health changes. Smart sensors and switches execute real-time network adjustments to address unusual demands on power grids and help avoid outages. Collision-avoidance radar technologies help direct vehicles both on the ground and in the air to steer clear of hazards. Crowdsourcing applications warn us of traffic congestion and provide dynamic route adjustments to help save fuel and lower stress.
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By: Jim Halpert and Anne Kierig

Online businesses and those with mobile applications have a new incentive to post privacy policies that comply with the California Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA).  California Attorney General Kamala Harris launched an online tool Friday through which people can report websites, mobile apps, and other online services that they allege are in violation of the law.  A business is in violation of CalOPPA if it fails to post privacy policies or posts policies that are incomplete and it fails to cure that violation within 30 days of notice from the Attorney General’s Office.  
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