Reposted from DLA Piper’s Media & Sport Group Bulletin

Editorial Team: Nick FitzpatrickDuncan Calow and Patrick Mitchell

Manhattan Federal court Judge Denny Chin is still hopeful that Google Inc and authors and publishers groups could reach a settlement after their six-year legal dispute, allowing nine more months for talks.
The US Google books case, which emerged out of a US class action bought by US publishers against Google, is likely to continue into 2012 as Judge Denny Chin set a court schedule that extends the deadline for talks through to next year. The judge adopted the proposed pre-trial schedule at a follow-up status conference on 15 September 2011, after allowing the groups the summer to revise the proposed settlement that was rejected on 22 March 2011 (please see our previous article in the April 2011 issue of Media Intelligence here), just over a year after its final fairness hearing.
The proposed pre-trial schedule could take the case to trial by July 2012. Judge Chin stated that all parties could request assistance from the court or magistrate judge if they needed.
Notwithstanding this proposed schedule, the parties confirmed that settlement talks were progressing and they plan to continue to negotiate in order to resolve their differences. Judge Chin stated he was still hopeful they could reach a settlement before the new deadline.

Manhattan Federal court Judge Denny Chin is still hopeful that Google Inc and authors and publishers groups could reach a settlement after their six-year legal dispute, allowing nine more months for talks.

The US Google books case, which emerged out of a US class action bought by US publishers against Google, is likely to continue into 2012 as Judge Denny Chin set a court schedule that extends the deadline for talks through to next year. The judge adopted the proposed pre-trial schedule at a follow-up status conference on 15 September 2011, after allowing the groups the summer to revise the proposed settlement that was rejected on 22 March 2011 (please see our previous article in the April 2011 issue of Media Intelligence here), just over a year after its final fairness hearing.

The proposed pre-trial schedule could take the case to trial by July 2012. Judge Chin stated that all parties could request assistance from the court or magistrate judge if they needed.

Notwithstanding this proposed schedule, the parties confirmed that settlement talks were progressing and they plan to continue to negotiate in order to resolve their differences. Judge Chin stated he was still hopeful they could reach a settlement before the new deadline.