Reposted from DLA Piper’s Media & Sport Group Bulletin

Editorial Team: Nick FitzpatrickDuncan Calow and Patrick Mitchell

Arsenal have successfully persuaded the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office to force a shop owner in Seville to change the name of her shop from ‘Arsenale’.
Arsenal succeeded in demonstrating that the use of the name Arsenale for a hat, shoe and clothes store in Seville constituted a breach of Arsenal’s trademark due to the risk of confusion between the two names.
The owner, Alicia Simon, registered the name Arsenale in 2007 and has faced a legal pursuit from the London club ever since. She claims that the name had nothing to do with the club and is in fact a reference to the Italian word given to shipbuilders’ yards in medieval Pisa and Venice. Indeed, Ms Simon’s assertion of cultural influences are supported by the location of the shop in the Arenal de Sevilla district, where Seville’s medieval shipyards were historically located.
Ms Simon has subsequently appealed the decision to a Madrid tribunal.

Arsenal have successfully persuaded the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office to force a shop owner in Seville to change the name of her shop from ‘Arsenale’.

Arsenal succeeded in demonstrating that the use of the name Arsenale for a hat, shoe and clothes store in Seville constituted a breach of Arsenal’s trademark due to the risk of confusion between the two names.

The owner, Alicia Simon, registered the name Arsenale in 2007 and has faced a legal pursuit from the London club ever since. She claims that the name had nothing to do with the club and is in fact a reference to the Italian word given to shipbuilders’ yards in medieval Pisa and Venice. Indeed, Ms Simon’s assertion of cultural influences are supported by the location of the shop in the Arenal de Sevilla district, where Seville’s medieval shipyards were historically located.

Ms Simon has subsequently appealed the decision to a Madrid tribunal.